Tag Archives: RooshV

Women hold up half the sky? That’s so cute, dearie

A Reader took a short break from 1040ing his earnings to Uncle Sam to eat lunch and browse the web and found yet another example of the pointlessness of MRAs:

Having stripped off the cardboard placards, they now carried 4 foot long 2 inch by 1 inch wide wooden sticks which they used in unison to hammer on the floor in tempo with a chant of: “MRA’s telling lies! We wont fall for your disguise!! Boom boom boom.” Those without wooden clubs kicked doors and lockers, matching those hammering the floor with wooden clubs, and shouting: “We wont fall for your disguise!”, while wearing bandanas and black balaclavas. — Did you know women hold up half the sky? | A Voice for Men.

MRAs are like Libertarian Party libertarians, they think that reason, facts, and discussion can achieve something against entrenched power, the dominant narrative, and the zero-knowledge general public. Good luck with that. MGTOW makes much more sense; like the Eternal Bachelor tagline used to say, give western women the husband they deserve: none.

Roosh, making a similar point:

Instead of taking real action with their lives, MRAs are hoping the government will one day serve their interests and give them things that me and my readers are achieving on their own. I don’t need the government to pass laws against alimony. I simply won’t marry in the USA. I don’t need the government to pass laws promoting fair child custody laws. I won’t impregnate an America girl. I don’t need the government to increase punishment for false rape accusers. I’ll cover my own back.

Close, but the way laws are written, interacting with a female in the West can make you a criminal on her say-so. This is why A Reader is weary of PUAs; they are leading men down a path filled with legal landmines.

Advertisements

New Books for April 2013

In the last month A Reader has bought four new non-work books, and will — might — write reviews, book notes, or reading observations (in increasing order of detail) for them:

  1. Arnold J. Toynbee’s A Study of History (abridgment by D. C. Sommervell), in two volumes. History, but without the leftist “let’s all hate Western Civilization” bias of most history books written after the 1960s. This will be my Big-Ass Book Challenge for April.
  2. Leonard Susskind’s The Black Hole War: My Battle with Stephen Hawking to Make the World Safe for Quantum Mechanics. Physics.
  3. Walter Isaacson’s biography of Steve Jobs. Apple’s hardware may be horribly overpriced and its users are mostly libtard proglodytes, but A Reader admires Jobs for what he achieved, especially his comeback from defeat.
  4. Tim Harford’s Adapt: Why Success Always Starts with Failure. He’s an economist, so I’d generally ignore this kind of book, but it was recommended by two guys I respect, both engineers with good taste in pop science books.

A Reader has been avoiding fiction for a while, because the way the world is going, fiction cannot compete with reality for shock value.

Roosh interviews Captain Capitalism

Read The Whole Thing.  A Reader especially likes the end:

I will continue to point out the absurdity of both religions (leftism and feminism) not just to increase the blood pressure of their adherents, but do what I can to help the younger generations avoid the fate that most leftists and feminists suffer. I also plan on living my life to it’s maximum level of enjoyment and fun. Not just for my sake, but to lead by example and provide people not so much “hope” as much as it is some general guidelines or advice that will make their lives easier. Besides, nothing angers a feminist or a socialist more than a bachelor who refuses to work, refuses to pay taxes, refuses to have children, refuses to “work for the commune,” and instead lives life solely for himself, achieving things they never will. —via 5 Questions With Captain Capitalism.

A Reader keeps declining “consulting” gigs (on top of his job), since he’d keep only half of the pay, he doesn’t need much money for the same reason as the Captain, and he’d rather spend his free time building stuff in his workshop and learning new skills.

Hello, World!

A funny thing happened the other day. A guy was fired. He had tweeted a photo of his lunch, and, in the background, you could see his bookshelf. In that bookshelf there were books that the powers that be disapproved of. Here’s Roosh V on the topic, though not the specific event.

Is it wise to start a blog of book notes (and other stuff) in such an environment? Probably not. Do I believe that pseudonymity will protect my identity if push comes to shove? Of course not, I’m not an idiot. Why do it then?

Because all it takes for ignorance to succeed is for informed people to be cowed into silence by the mob.