Author Archives: A Reader

Women hold up half the sky? That’s so cute, dearie

A Reader took a short break from 1040ing his earnings to Uncle Sam to eat lunch and browse the web and found yet another example of the pointlessness of MRAs:

Having stripped off the cardboard placards, they now carried 4 foot long 2 inch by 1 inch wide wooden sticks which they used in unison to hammer on the floor in tempo with a chant of: “MRA’s telling lies! We wont fall for your disguise!! Boom boom boom.” Those without wooden clubs kicked doors and lockers, matching those hammering the floor with wooden clubs, and shouting: “We wont fall for your disguise!”, while wearing bandanas and black balaclavas. — Did you know women hold up half the sky? | A Voice for Men.

MRAs are like Libertarian Party libertarians, they think that reason, facts, and discussion can achieve something against entrenched power, the dominant narrative, and the zero-knowledge general public. Good luck with that. MGTOW makes much more sense; like the Eternal Bachelor tagline used to say, give western women the husband they deserve: none.

Roosh, making a similar point:

Instead of taking real action with their lives, MRAs are hoping the government will one day serve their interests and give them things that me and my readers are achieving on their own. I don’t need the government to pass laws against alimony. I simply won’t marry in the USA. I don’t need the government to pass laws promoting fair child custody laws. I won’t impregnate an America girl. I don’t need the government to increase punishment for false rape accusers. I’ll cover my own back.

Close, but the way laws are written, interacting with a female in the West can make you a criminal on her say-so. This is why A Reader is weary of PUAs; they are leading men down a path filled with legal landmines.

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More from The Black Hole War

Reading Susskind’s book over lunch — yet another advantage of MGTOW — A Reader finds this passage very interesting:

[For] a mathematical result, the more technical, precise, unintuitive, and difficult it is, the more it shocks people into recognizing the value of a new way of thinking. — Susskind, Leonard (2008-07-07). The Black Hole War: My Battle with Stephen Hawking to Make the World Safe for Quantum Mechanics (p. 311). Hachette Book Group. Kindle Edition.

The book started out narrative but now there’s some serious science being explained; this might take longer to read than A Reader originally thought. There still no math, but a lot of concepts and a lot of counterintuitive ideas. (Physics sure has changed a lot since college.)

The Real Cost of Women in the Workplace

Thinking like an economist, a MGTOW forum poster makes the same mistakes they do:

A woman being hired over a man almost always costs the company more money and returns less revenue. Women, due to biology, are going to miss more work, work less hours, and statistically will work fewer years than a comparably educated and experienced man would — The Opportunity Cost of Twats.

A Reader and his faithful Tennessee friend Jack know the real costs of hiring women into productive companies: instead of fitting themselves to the workplace, they force the workplace to fit to them, disrupting operations and threatening sexual harassement or discrimination lawsuits anytime something doesn’t go their way. That is the real cost. The economics blather above is the rounding error.

Obama’s insulting salary stunt

When some bright-eyed recently minted engineer starts telling A Reader about how the new rich people like the Google founders are down-to-earth, drive small cars, etc, A Reader always points out how driving a small car when you use airliners as private planes and stash billions in offshore accounts isn’t comparable to driving a small car that is your only means of transportation and you have to work extra shifts to pay for it. This is what A Reader was reminded of when he saw:

Obama characterized his 5% as sharing the sacrifice that the sequester is forcing some public sector employees to make. It’s just not the same kind of sacrifice. He won’t even feel his sacrifice. And if he does, he can ease his tiny pains with another deluxe vacation and a few more concerts at the White House performed by whichever pop stars his daughters are enthusing over this month. — Althouse: “Obama’s insulting salary stunt.”.

The worst part is that the venal mass media will present this as a great sacrifice and an important and significant gesture, and the ruminant sheeple of the general public will agree.

Learn your lesson, little people of Europe

Rules are for the little people:

During the period when all banks in Cyprus were supposedly closed, Russian oligarchs, Cypriot politicians, and other depositors — who just happen to be extremely wealthy and influential — were somehow able to spirit their assets out of the country before the levy kicked in, leaving medium-sized depositors, mostly entrepreneurs, to bear the brunt of the “haircut”. —Dirty Money, Clean Money: Cyprus and Germany | Gates of Vienna.

What was it that Ayn Rand said? When you take away the economy of money, you get the economy of pull.

Toynbee: politically incorrect, factually correct.

A Reader is about two-thirds into Leonard Susskind’s The Black Hole War, but decided to take a quick peek inside Toynbee’s first tome:

[W]hen a frontier between a more highly and a less highly civilized society ceases to advance, the balance does not settle down to a stable equilibrium but inclines, with the passage of time, in the more backward society’s favour. — Toynbee, Arnold J.; D.C. Somervell (1947-12-31). A Study of History: Abridgement of Volumes I-VI (p. 10). Oxford University Press. Kindle Edition.

Can you imagine a current day teacher using the phrase A Reader bolded above?

Get your course credit here, no effort required

Via Captain Capitalism,* A Reader discovers how low universities have descended:

You will spend a lot of time on the Internet for this course, studying blogs, commenting on them, producing your own. We will also examine a number of print genres that might be considered precursors to blogs, including newspaper columns, diaries, journals, essays, pamphlets, miscellanies, and war reporting.  — ENGL 488B – Spring 2012 | English Department, University of Maryland.

How much do these kids pay to browse the web and blog? (These kids? Ha! The taxpayer will be on the hook for their student loans.) Perhaps this course should have a module on bussing tables and mopping floors, because that’s the job this education is preparing them for. But these kids will end up in the Occupy movement, complaining about the “system.”

Hey, geniuses, A Reader was repairing small electronics and appliances by 15; that’s called a trade, and it pays bills. A Reader got an engineering degree and went to work even before graduation, because that’s what people who know how to do things that create value in a productive economy do. And when A Reader decided to start blogging, it took 10 minutes to learn the basics of WordPress and set up everything necessary.

Learn something useful that can’t be picked up in ten minutes by a moderately smart kid (like A Reader’s colleagues’ children), or save yourself the money and start your MickeyD’s or Starbucks career today.

We will read around in new media studies (e.g., Jaron Lanier, Clay Shirky, Cass Sunstein) to help get a handle on where blogs fit into the mediascape of Web 2.0.

Yes, all those people blogging first had to read  Jaron Lanier (Who?), Clay Shirky (he’s ok, I guess), and commie centralist Cass “dogs should have the same rights as humans, but humans shouldn’t have any freedoms that I disagree with” Sunstein.

(* Captain Capitalism may be an economist, but  he’s not an idiot like the typical economist. Get his book to enjoy the decline. Another good economist to follow, despite being a finance guy and therefore parasitical on the productive system, is Peter Schiff.)